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Vaccine effectiveness reduces after Inadequate sleep

Before vaccinations, get plenty of rest since it could affect

the effectiveness of the shot

Inadequate sleep reduces the effectiveness of vaccinations,

especially for men

Lack of sleep may cause vaccine antibodies to decrease, according to a recent study the following unexpected conclusions might be drawn about the effectiveness of the flu or covid vaccines:

Less than six hours of sleep was found to reduce protection by limiting the body's reaction to the shot.

What little is yet known about the coronavirus is another point.

Guys who slept for fewer than six hours had significantly fewer antibodies after receiving vaccinations.

According to a recent study, getting little sleep the days before or after receiving a vaccination may reduce its efficiency, particularly for men.

Men who reported sleeping six hours or less the night before and after vaccination had a significantly reduced antibody response. Women did not show the same association – although more data are needed.

PAST COVID INFECTION PROVIDES AS MUCH PROTECTION AS VACCINES,

NEW RESEARCH

Researchers assessed antibody responses to influenza and hepatitis vaccines (in 299 adults aged 18 . - 6 years) using data from seven previous studies in the PubM database. (They excluded adults 65 and older because that age group has poorer sleep quality and duration.) "How this happens is not well understood, but data suggests that aspects of sleep, such as slow-wave sleep or hormones released during sleep, such as growth hormones - can interact directly with the immune system to support protection." "Lack of sleep also affects recovery from illness." He added, "The bottom line is that there is compelling evidence that insufficient sleep impairs our immune system's ability to make protective antibodies after vaccination."

IRREGULAR SLEEP MAY INCREASE RISK OF HEART DISEASE, STUDY SHOWS

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, was not surprised by the study's findings (he was not involved in the study). proven link between sleep and the immune system. "Studies have shown that people who don't get enough or full quality (deep REM) sleep are more susceptible to viral infections," he told Fox News Digital. "Lack of sleep also affects recovery from illness." In men, the amount of antibodies was significantly reduced compared to women. Dr. Prather did not expect such a large gender difference in antibody response. "There is data to suggest that vaccines work differently in men and women, and some data support a benefit in women, including the COVID-19 vaccine," he said. "However, this meta-analysis suggests that sleepy men have a less optimal response to vaccination than women." "Insufficient sleep weakens our immune system's ability to form protective antibodies." Discussing the findings, the study authors said that the smaller effect of sleep on antibodies in women was "probably due to large differences in sex hormone levels by phase of the menstrual cycle, hormonal contraceptive use, menopausal status and use." hormone replacement in postmenopausal women." Similar studies on the relationship between sleep and COVID-19 vaccines have yet to be conducted. However, researchers believe that insufficient sleep in the days surrounding the COVID vaccine may lead to a similar decrease in antibodies two .months after the injection. People may have overestimated their sleep The researchers looked at two different types of studies: self-reported studies, in which participants reported their sleep patterns, and objective studies, in which participants' sleep was monitored with special equipment or in a sleep lab.

APPROXIMATELY 20% OF AMERICANS USING SLEEP MEETS,

CDC RELEASES: "SCARYING" DATA

Self-reported studies found that although antibody levels decreased in those who slept less than six hours, it was not "statistically significant." In objective studies, there was a "strong decrease" in the antibody response in men, the findings noted. The authors of the study suggested that this may be because people in self-administered studies overestimated the number of hours they slept. researchers noted study limitations. Dr. Prather noted that only a handful of studies have looked at the relationship between sleep and vaccine response. He also said more research is needed to determine specific time windows when sleep may be most important. "For example, it may be that getting enough sleep the nights before or after vaccination confers a unique advantage," he told Fox News Digital. "For example, we found that short sleep in the two nights before the flu shot was critical for predicting antibodies months later."

YEARS FOR FDA'S COVID VACCINE PROPOSAL? "THE WAGON BEFORE THE HORSE," SAYS DOCTOR

The researchers also call for further research to determine the optimal sleep time for the antibody response and the reason for the significant differences in sleep effects between the sexes. "Collecting data on sleep duration during vaccination and sex hormone levels in millions of people receiving vaccines and boosters against COVID-19 and other viruses is an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the role of sleep duration in vaccine response," explained the study authors. wrote The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults ages 18 to 6 get 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns on its website that lack of sleep is linked to several serious conditions, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity and depression.


"Bottom line: Get good sleep while you get the vaccine and right after you get it," advised Dr. Siegel. (Kaiser Health News)


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